Part 5-Weight Management and Celiac Disease-Wrapping it Up-Gluten Free Style

There’s been a lot of ground covered over the past couple of weeks regarding managing your weight on a gluten free diet, and how celiac disease can affect weight control.

In Part 1 of this series, I revealed how I was a cheater at the gluten free diet. In Part 2, we covered some physical and psychological reasons why you may experience weight loss or gain with celiac disease/gluten intolerance. In Part 3, we reviewed some action you can take to lose weight/fat if you choose, on a gluten free diet. In Part 4, we covered strategies for gaining weight in a controlled and healthy manner if gaining is your goal.

The upshot of all this is that whatever you goal is as far as weight and/or body composition, you can achieve it.

And really, achieving those goals in within reach for all of us.

You choose a goal, make a plan to get there, and execute.

Sounds easy, doesn’t it?

In reality, it may not be quite that easy.

achieve your goal at the top of the stairs

Photo credit zandi2000

But it doesn’t have to be terribly hard. You can achieve what you set your mind to. You choose a goal-whether it’s to reach the top of those stairs, lose 20 pounds, fit into a smaller pant size, do 10 push ups, squat a bunch of weight, or run a marathon. The only thing stopping you-is you.

We need to get out of our own way. To set aside the preconceptions of our abilities. To shatter the expectations that others may have of us.

For today-choose one thing. Make that one thing your goal for this week. I was talking to a client yesterday, and her goal this week is to bump up her water intake to 3-4 liters a day. That’s a great goal-measurable, achievable and realistic. When that one thing becomes habit and no longer takes work, then you set a new goal. With time, all of these things add up, and you’ve changed your lifestyle in a maintainable way.

In my post on the gluten free diet as a lifestyle, I talked about the definition of “diet” and how it may be more beneficial to wrap our heads around the word/concept in a different way. This is your life. Live in it now-not with “if only” and “should have””s.

Soon I will be releasing a series of worksheets and guidelines on getting started with a healthy gluten free lifestyle. To hold you over until then, please check out my free guide if you haven’t already. If you’d like my personal assistance, click here.

What’s your goal for this week? Don’t be shy-post it below! When you put it in black and white, it becomes real. Go get ‘em!

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  1. I’ve been enjoying this series, Erin. I know you’re performing a great service for many! Thanks also for the shout out the other day. :-) As far as goals, it always surprises me what others find hard and I find easy–drinking water for example. I have no issues drinking water. I get in tons of water. On weekends, usually water is my only beverage. During the week, I have tea in the mornings. (That work thing, you know?) I’m sure others would be surprised at what I find difficult though. So often I go to bed with a plan for the next day and the week and it quickly goes to naught once I get out of bed and other things happen. Thanks for the encouragement and great info here. I need to go back and re-read all your posts in this series. I still have issues with you calling starting out with a healthier, real food approach “cheating,” but I understand your point.

    Hugs,
    Shirley

  2. Erin says:

    Hi Shirley!
    I know on the use of the word “cheating”-it was mostly in the hope if getting people to sit up and take notice ;)
    We all certainly have our own unique challenges! I think it’s great that you have a plan-now it seems to me that the next step for you would be taking a look at that plan, and seeing what you can do to make executing that plan easier. For example, what can you do the night before so that when you get up in the morning, no matter what life throws your way, you’re much more prepared to continue and follow through with your plan.
    I’m glad you’ve found the info helpful. That’s what I’m here for-and it always makes my day to hear my message has been useful :)

  3. I was diagnosed with Coeliac’s disease at the beginning of 2011. Before that I would eat anything and everything and can’t seem to stop. I’ve been having very severe stomach pains and lots of other pain in my abdomen area for a long time. I try so hard to eat properly because of the fear the doctor has put into me, but get so darn frustrated. I try to bake bread but seem to mess it up. If I get it right then it goes bad fast. It’s like I can’t seem to maintaina healthy diet and enjoy food. I have no patience for making “everything” that I eat and no will power. I’m 287 pounds and 5’4″ tall and way overweight according to the BMI index. Living in remote region in Northern Alaska makes it a bit incovenient to buy gluten-free products without bartering a seal and a whale for shipping. So… I . I dont know how much longer I can keep this up. I constantly say to myself that I’ve been eating this way for 41 years and have been miserable for just about that long that why does it matter if I’m gluten free? It’s an everyday struggle with myself and I really have no support groups except what’s on this internet.

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